Explore species profiles below or click here to browse associated articles.

June is the main time of year to watch out for webs of Lackey moth caterpillars: hawthorn and blackthorn shrubs are good places to look.
Photo: Terry Thirlaway

 

Watch out for Large Skippers from May to September in meadows, and in woodland rides and glades.
Photo: Steve Townsend

 

This small and delicate butterfly is a protected species due to its serious decline in numbers, but the Lizard is somewhere they are hanging on.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Male Orange tip 128Orange-tips can be seen on the wing along the hedgerows and verges as the weather becomes warmer in mid- to late spring.
Photo: Andreas Eichler

 

Peacock butterflyPeacock butterflies emerge into the sunshine from their winter sleep in the spring.
Photo: Terry Thirlaway

Peacock butterflyWhile butterflies and moths are not generally as efficient pollinators as some other insects, they do their bit. Read on to find out more.
Photo: Terry Thirlaway

Poplar Hawk-moth caterpillars will happily munch their way through willow (Salix sp.).
Photo: Ray Surridge

Over the last three years, researchers from the University of Exeter have surveyed and monitored all known populations of Marsh fritillary on the Lizard by conducting larval web counts in early spring. Several MSc students have also demonstrated that both the structure of the vegetation and amount of devil’s-bit scabious are key factors in determining population size within a site.
We now are reasonably confident to suggest that Marsh fritillaries are restricted to just two major colonies on the Lizard, although they have been recorded from an additional 8 sites which potentially support small populations - and thus this species remains extremely vulnerable.Devils-bit Scabious

Privet HawkmothThis lovely Privet Hawkmoth was spotted at Caerthillian, resting on a fence.
Photo: Steve Townsend

The migratory Red Admiral butterfly can be spotted from spring until winter in the milder climate of the south-west.
Photo: Amanda Scott