Explore species profiles below or click here to browse associated articles.

Over the last three years, researchers from the University of Exeter have surveyed and monitored all known populations of Marsh fritillary on the Lizard by conducting larval web counts in early spring. Several MSc students have also demonstrated that both the structure of the vegetation and amount of devil’s-bit scabious are key factors in determining population size within a site.
We now are reasonably confident to suggest that Marsh fritillaries are restricted to just two major colonies on the Lizard, although they have been recorded from an additional 8 sites which potentially support small populations - and thus this species remains extremely vulnerable.Devils-bit Scabious

Privet HawkmothThis lovely Privet Hawkmoth was spotted at Caerthillian, resting on a fence.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Purple Hairstreak, Favonius quercus, Cornwall, The Lizard, butterflyThis pretty butterfly is not uncommon, but hard to spot as it spends most of its time flying at the tops of oak trees. You might see one in July to August, when they occasionally come down to feed on bramble nectar; they have been seen at Erisey Barton on The Lizard.
Photo: Sharp Photography (via Wiki Commons)

The migratory Red Admiral butterfly can be spotted from spring until winter in the milder climate of the south-west.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Ringlets may not be as showy as some other butterflies, but they have their own gentle charm.
Photo: Terry Thirlaway

Silver-washed Fritillary, butterfly, The LizardThe Silver-washed Fritillary is the largest of the UK Fritillaries. Look out for it at the height of summer, in July and August.
Photo: Ray Surridge

Six-spot Burnet Moth

This day-flying moth is a common sight in mid- to late summer, with its flashes of red colour amongst the knapweed and thistles.
Photo: Steve Townsend

 

One of our butterflies that is on the wing into autumn, watch out on warmer days for the coppery colours of the fast-flying Small Copper butterfly.
Photo: Ray Surridge

On the Lizard, this pretty butterfly is mainly a coastal species.
Photo: Amanda Scott

 

 

Small TortoiseshellSmall Tortoiseshells usually produce two broods in a year, and so a second-generation of adults emerges in August.
Photo: Terry Thirlaway