A collaboration of coast and countryside organisations on The Lizard Peninsula

Harebell

Harebell

Nodding Harebell flowers start to blossom on the Lizard from July, taking over from Sheep’s-bit as it begins to fade.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Hart's-tongue

Hart's-tongueThe woods behind Kennack Sands are a great spot for ferns, including the distinctive and evergreen Hart’s-tongue.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Hemp-agrimony

The fluffy pink flowers of Hemp-agrimony blossom in damp places on The Lizard in mid- to late-summer.
Photo: Amanda Scott
 

Holly

Holly“Deck the halls with boughs of holly”…Perhaps the favourite plant for Christmas decorations, Holly is also one of our most familiar woodland shrubs. Look out for its evergreen leaves on The Lizard throughout the year.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Hottentot-fig

Hottentot Fig gailhampshire from Cradley, Malvern, U.K / CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)The bright pink and yellow flowers of Hottentot-fig look cheerful on sea cliffs in the summer, but this is an introduced and invasive species.
Photo: Gail Hampshire (Wikimedia Commons)

Ivy

Ivy provides shelter and food for many species of invertebrates, birds and small mammals, so its autumn flowers are a welcome sight. Look out for it climbing up trees or carpeting woodland floors.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Jelly Ear

Jelly Ear, Josh Milburn (Wikimedia Commons)Jelly Ear fungus can be spotted in the autumn and right through winter. It is usually found on dead or dying Elder wood.
Photo: Josh Milburn via Wikimedia Commons

Kidney Vetch

Kidney Vetch (photo by Amanda Scott)

The books say Kidney Vetch blooms from June, but this is The Lizard, so it flowers from May. Look out for it on cliff tops and sand dunes from late spring through into summer.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Land Quillwort

Look out for the ‘Catherine Wheel’ leaf rosettes of Land Quillwort between autumn and spring, a plant that, in mainland Britain, is only found on The Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Lesser Celandine

The bright buttery glint of Lesser Celandine in the hedgerows and fields is a welcome early sign of spring. 
Photo: Steve Townsend